2018 in Pictures

From a heartwarming reintroduction to a surprise at sea, we picked our 10 favorite images (and stories) from the year in conservation.

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Run for the Wild

Make tracks for giraffes at our annual 5K through the Bronx Zoo. Sign up today to run on Saturday, April 27.

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Cities Are Central

Urbanization and the subsequent human demographic transition may hold the key to the survival of tigers, says a new WCS-led study.

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Renaissance of Nature

WCS's Joe Walston on the trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization and what they mean for the future of wildlife.

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No to Drilling

Oil and gas development should not occur in one of America’s most unspoiled, treasured landscapes. Check out the statement from our CEO and President Cristian Samper on the latest involving the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

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Anti-Poaching Success

The latest case of elephant poachers in the Republic of Congo illustrates the importance of ongoing investment in the protection of Nouabale-Ndoki National Park.

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ELEPHANTS
APES
AFRICA
BIG CATS
SHARKS, SKATES, and RAYS
LATIN AMERICA and THE CARIBBEAN

By harnessing the power of its global field conservation programs and its four zoos and aquarium in New York, WCS aims to make measurable progress in the conservation of the flagship species groups pictured and its priority places.

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ASIA
NORTH AMERICA
WHALES and COASTAL DOLPHINS
OCEANS
TORTOISES and FRESHWATER TURTLES

By harnessing the power of its global field conservation programs and its four zoos and aquarium in New York, WCS aims to make measurable progress in the conservation of a number of flagship species groups and priority places.

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In the news

January 11, 2019 | National Geographic

Ways of Adapting to Climate Change Are Gaining Steam

Communities need to build resilience to the threats even as the world seeks ways to curb emissions.

January 8, 2019 | The New York Times

Why Do Whales Sing?

Scientists still aren’t certain, and maybe the whales aren’t, either. Dr. Melinda Rekdahl on the latest research.

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