Media Availability: John Calvelli Testifies before House Panel on Importance of Wildlife Funding

“Conservation of the Earth‘s wildlife and habitat is a global priority and requires nations to work together cooperatively since wildlife and wild places recognize no political boundaries.”

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – March 25, 2010 – Today, John F. Calvelli, the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Executive Vice President of Public Affairs, testified before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment & Related Agencies to advocate for essential funding for wildlife and wild places around the world.  In arguing for appropriations to both domestic and international programs from the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture, Calvelli stressed that funding decisions made now will determine the nature of our planet for centuries to come.
 
Calvelli spoke in support of increased commitment to the following programs as part of the FY11 Interior, EPA and Related Agencies Appropriations Act:

  • Department of the Interior Climate Change Adaptation Initiative;
  • Department of the Interior Youth in Natural Resources Initiative;
  • Bureau of Land Management Eco-regional Assessments;
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program;
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Multinational Species Conservation Fund;
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife Without Borders Global and Regional Programs; and
  • U.S. Forest Service and U.S. National Park Service International Programs.
The following are excerpts from Calvelli’s testimony:

“A decade into the 21st Century, our society has come to a crossroads. The direction we take over the next ten years will likely determine the nature of our planet for centuries to come. Conservation of the Earth‘s wildlife and habitat is a global priority and requires nations to work together cooperatively since wildlife and wild places recognize no political boundaries. Global conservation is inextricably linked with the health and security of all Americans and the protection of U.S. interests overseas. Deforestation, habitat loss, over hunting and fishing, illegal poaching, emerging diseases, and the dislocations wrought by climate change have scientists estimating that as many as 2/3 of all species could be near extinct by the end of the century.”

“Greater investment in conservation will strengthen America’s natural resource base and reaffirm the leadership of the U.S. government within the global community, and encourage coordinated global efforts to save the world’s last remaining wildlife and wild places.”

Calvelli thanked the Subcommittee’s chair, Rep. James P. Moran (D-VA), and ranking member, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-ID), for the invitation to testify on behalf of WCS and their attention to the global environmental challenges that necessitate funding appropriations.

Special Note: Calvelli is available for interviews to discuss his testimony to the subcommittee and other matters dealing with funding for wildlife and wild places as Congress debates its appropriations decisions for FY11. Electronic copies of his testimony are available upon request.
 
Contact:
Chip Weiskotten - cweiskotten@wcs.org, 202-624-8173


The Wildlife Conservation Society saves wildlife and wild places worldwide. We do so through science, global conservation, education and the management of the world's largest system of urban wildlife parks, led by the flagship Bronx Zoo. Together these activities change attitudes towards nature and help people imagine wildlife and humans living in harmony. WCS is committed to this mission because it is essential to the integrity of life on Earth. 

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