Southern Sudan's Wildlife Treasure

January 20, 2011

In an op-ed published on CNN.com about the elections in Southern Sudan, WCS CEO and President Dr. Steven Sanderson argues that a sound conservation and resource management agenda will be a vital part of a nation-building process there.

Latest Update:
WCS conservationist Paul Elkan discusses why an independent Southern Sudan will benefit from taking care of its wildlife in a letter to the International Herald Tribune also printed in the New York Times. Elkan took the above photo from a plane flying over one the greatest migrations on the planet, 1.3 million white-eared kob.

Read more from the International Herald Tribune >>


January 8, 2011

As the people of Southern Sudan cast ballots for independence, WCS CEO and President Dr. Steven Sanderson argues that a sound conservation and resource management agenda will be a vital part of a nation-building process there.


This Sunday, more than 3 million people in Southern Sudan are expected to vote in a referendum to create a nation in Eastern Africa.

As they do, there is a historic opportunity, perhaps unprecedented, for wildlife conservation, sustainable natural resource management and environmentally friendly ecotourism to be integrated into the nation-building process.

Land-use issues loom large in the election. Vast oil deposits in Southern Sudan account for roughly 98% of the region's revenues and will come under the south's management if it becomes a separate country. The White Nile flows through Southern Sudan toward Khartoum, adding water to the region's resource issues.

The hidden jewel in this unique landscape is its stunning wildlife. 
~/media/Images/wcs org/forms/please donate to help conservation.png

Popular Tags