Slideshows - Big Cats – Saving Wildlife

Life on the Savannah Slideshow
At 1483 square miles, Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda’s largest park, shelters a huge variety of savannah wildlife. But life for its lions, hyenas, and other large carnivores isn’t easy.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
Tutilo Mudumba, WCS-Uganda Senior Carnivore Researcher, counts lions in Murchison Falls National Park. Nighttime is the best time to encounter these nocturnal predators.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
A recording of a buffalo calf in distress, played from speakers atop Mudumba’s Land Rover, draws the big cats to the car.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
By daylight, Mudumba and Naboth Kyaligonza, a ranger with the Uganda Wildlife Authority, dismantle snares in the park, illegally set by poachers intending to kill antelope and other hoofed animals for meat.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
An estimated 14 percent of the lions that live within Murchison Falls National Park have snare injuries. Some are killed in the traps, and the poachers sell their skins for a high profit.
Tutilo Mudumba © WCS
In addition to lions, Murchison Falls National Park is home to herds of giraffes and elephants, along with hyenas, vultures, and storks, among a at least 109 other mammals and 476 other bird species.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
Jackson's hartebeest are prey for lions. Poachers also target these antelope for meat, threatening their small and mostly declining populations.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
White-backed vultures in Uganda's parks face an increasing threat of poisoning. They scavenge the carcasses that farmers sometimes lace with insecticide to retaliate against lions that prey on their cattle.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
WCS-Uganda staff in Queen Elizabeth National Park have fitted a number of resident lions with radio collars. Here, WCS conservationists Edward Okot and Mustapha Nsubuga search for their signals.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
Murchison Falls National Park is divided by the world's longest river, the Nile. The river explodes through a narrow cleft in the Rift Valley escarpment and falls to a frothing pool.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS
Only 415 lions remain in Uganda’s network of national parks, and in Murchison Falls National Park, the largest of them all, just 132 remain.
Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS

Tiger Camera Trap ©WCS

Wildlife Crimes Unit

Tigers are fast disappearing in the wild, due in large part to increasing illegal wildlife trade across Asia.  Our Wildlife Crimes Unit is working to support the arrest and prosecution of poachers and wildlife traders so that we can ensure a future for these cats in some of their last strongholds. Take a look at what WCS conservationists working throughout tiger territory have come across in their surveys and patrols.

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